The New 2018 Subaru WRX and WRX STI | Spotlight

Introducing the newly redesigned 2018 Subaru WRX and WRX STI.

The WRX and STI meet for some high-intensity hooning. The result: a pure
adrenaline rush and a cold sweat, featuring the only appropriate
soundtrack—the blissful exhaust sounds of the SUBARU BOXER engine.

The best-handling, best- performing WRX and WRX STI ever.

Available Spring 2017

New 2018 WRX & WRX STI Feature Updates
—————————————————————-
– Revised suspension tuning
– Driver Controlled Center Differential (STI only)
– Brembo monoblock calipers (6 pistons in the front and 2 in the rear, STI
only)
– Larger-diameter rotors are cross-drilled for better heat management (STI
only)
– 19-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 245/35R 19 tires (STI only)
– Recaro® performance seats (Available on WRX Premium, WRX STI and
WRX STI Limited)
– 6.3-inch multifunction display with turbo boost gauge
– LED Steering Responsive Headlights (WRX Limited and STI Only)

2018 Subaru WRX Specs:
————————————-
Engine type: Direct-injected, turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder Boxer Engine
Horsepower: 268 hp
Torque: 258 lb-ft

2018 Subaru WRX STI Specs:
——————————————-
Engine type: Turbocharged 2.5-liter 4- cylinder Boxer Engine
Horsepower: 305 hp
Torque: 290 lb-ft

2018 Subaru WRX STI Commercial

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2017 Audi RS 5 450hp – Perfect Coupe!!

Gran turismo combines aesthetics and everyday usability Powerful and efficient V6 biturbo with 600 Nm (442.5 lb-ft) of torque Audi Sport boss Winkelmann: “More performance coupled with higher efficiency”

The new Audi RS 5 Coupé* is the first Audi Sport model in the new RS design idiom. The car’s all-new 2.9 TFSI biturbo engine produces 331 kW (450 hp) and delivers 600 Nm (442.5 lb-ft) of torque. Standard quattro drive distributes the power to all four wheels.

“The new Audi RS 5 Coupé is the gran turismo among the RS models from Audi Sport. The high-performance Coupé combines elegant aesthetics with high everyday usability. The car’s V6 biturbo has been developed from the ground up and provides significantly more performance coupled with higher efficiency,” said Stephan Winkelmann, CEO of Audi Sport GmbH, in describing the new model.

The designers drew inspiration for the RS 5 Coupé from the distinctive racing details of the Audi 90 quattro IMSA GTO. Massive air inlets with the honeycomb structure typical of RS models characterize the front end of the new Audi RS 5 Coupé. The Singleframe radiator grille is much wider and flatter than in the base model. Next to the headlights are additional lateral air intakes and outlets; tinted bezels differentiate the optional Matrix LED headlights. quattro blisters on the flanks emphasize the pronounced bulges over the wheel arches, which have been widened by 15 millimeters (0.6 in).

Sporty accents are provided by the RS-specific diffuser insert, the oval tailpipes of the RS exhaust system and surface-mounted spoiler lip. The RS 5 Coupé rolls standard on 19-inch wheels, with 20-inch wheels available as an option. The appearance packages – gloss black, carbon and matt aluminum – provide even more customization options. With a length of 4,723 millimeters (185.9 in), the new Audi RS 5 Coupé is 74 millimeters (2.9 in) longer than the previous model.

The 2.9 TFSI V6 biturbo engine, which Audi developed from the ground up, offers sharp increases in power and efficiency as well as an incomparably full-bodied RS sound. It produces 331 kW (450 hp). Its peak torque of 600 Nm (442.5 lb-ft) – up 170 Nm (125.4 lb-ft) from the previous model – is available across a wide band from 1,900 to 5,000 rpm. The top model in the A5 family sprints from 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.9 seconds and with the optional dynamic package reaches a top speed of 280 km/h (174.0 mph).

The 2.9 TFSI unit’s two turbochargers are positioned centrally between the cylinder banks. The ingested air flows to the respective turbocharger and into the combustion chambers through a dual-branch system for spontaneous response. The B-cycle combustion process with central direct injection represents a new level of efficiency among the RS models. The shortened compression stroke used here enables an engine process with a significantly higher geometric compression ratio. Combined with a power stroke that, while normal, is longer relative to the compression stroke, this allows for more efficient combustion and increased engine efficiency. In the NEDC, the V6 biturbo consumes just 8.7 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers (27.0 US mpg), corresponding to 197 grams CO2 per kilometer (317.0 g/mi). This is an efficiency gain of 17 percent over the previous model. Another factor in the greater efficiency of the newRS 5 Coupé is its significantly lower weight. It tips the scales at 1,655 kilograms (3,648.7 lb), 60 kilograms (132.3 lb) less than before. A roof of carbon with a visible fiber structure is available as an option.

The biturbo’s power flows through a sportily-tuned, eight-speed tiptronic with optimized shift times to the quattro permanent all-wheel drive. The drive forces are distributed asymmetrically to the axles (40:60) to guarantee dynamic handling with optimal traction and the greatest possible safety. Audi Sport also offers an optional rear sport differential.

An updated five-link construction is used on the front axle. At the rear, a five-link suspension replaces the trapezoidal-link suspension used on the previous model. This benefits the sporty driving characteristics and agility. It also improves comfort significantly. With the standard RS sport suspension, the new Audi RS 5 Coupé sits much lower than the production model.
Audi Sport also offers the RS sport suspension with Dynamic Ride Control (DRC), ceramic brakes and dynamic steering with RS-specific tuning. ……..
Over 13,000 units of the first-generation Audi RS 5 Coupé have been delivered to customers since 2010. The new high-performance coupé is coming to dealerships in Germany and other European countries in June 2017. The price is EUR 80,900.

2018 Ferrari 812 Superfast 800Hp – Perfect Car!!

Ferrari 812 Superfast revealed with 789 horsepower Meet the new Ferrari 812 Superfast, which made its in-the-flesh debut this week at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. It’s an updated version of the F12 Berlinetta and introduces a new 6.5-liter V-12 delivering a massive 789 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 530 pound-feet of torque at 7,000 rpm.

Yes, the engine appears to be very rev happy, but it also produces 80 percent of its torque from just 3,500 rpm. To attain these numbers the engineers added direct fuel injection as well as variable length intake tracts designed to boost volumetric efficiency of the engine.

Ferrari previously used the variable intake tracts on its LaFerrari, so it’s no surprise that the 812 Superfast’s engine is producing similar numbers to the Ferrari flagship’s 6.3-liter V-12. Of course, the LaFerrari has a little extra help from its hybrid system, too.

According to Ferrari, the 812 Superfast has a dry weight of 3,362 pounds. The automaker also claims a 0-62 mph time of 2.9 seconds (0.2 seconds quicker than the F12 Berlinetta and about equal to the F12 tdf) and a top speed of 211 mph.

The 812 Superfast maintains the F12’s 7-speed dual-clutch transmission, although it benefits from new gear ratios which, combined with shorter up and down-shifting times between gears, sharpen throttle response still further.

Another change compared to the F12 is the adoption of electronic power steering, a first for a Ferrari. There’s also updated versions of the four-wheel-steering system that debuted on the F12 tdf and the side-slip control system that we first saw on the 458 Speciale.

The lines of the car are much busier compared to the F12, especially at the rear. Up front we see the new design trend for Ferrari headlights. These are full-LED units that are integrated into the sculpted air intakes on the hood. There are also active aero elements such as adjustable flaps found at the front and rear of the car, used to control drag and downforce levels.

The interior is just as busy as the exterior, with knobs, buttons and display screens popping up all over the dash. There are also new seats said to feature a more ergonomic design. You’ll also note new display screens in the center stack and on the passenger side of the dash.

The 812 Superfast should reach the United States late this year or early next. To learn about some of the other vehicles that bowed in Geneva, head to our dedicated hub.

2017 Lamborghini Huracan Performante – interior Exterior and Drive

2017 Lamborghini Huracán Performante First Drive: A New Force
Lambo’s new technology redefines active aero…with astounding results

The most fascinating aspect of the new Lamborghini Huracán Performante isn’t its increased power, new tires, reworked suspension, or improved ABS system. It isn’t its recalculated stability and traction control programs, upgraded transmission, or decreased weight, either.

Nope, the part of the Performante that’s going to excite you supercar lovers the most is ALA. That’s short for Aerodynamica Lamborghini Attiva, and the folks from Sant’Agata have just patented it because ALA is an entirely new way to do active aerodynamics.

That isn’t all that’s improved, though. Power is up! And that’s always a good thing. Especially when your garden variety Huracán is capable of producing “only” 602 horsepower and 413 lb-ft of torque from its 5.2-liter naturally aspirated V-10. For Performante duty, the engine gets new intake and exhaust camshafts, an air intake borrowed from the gentlemen racer Super Trofeo Huracáns, and a new exhaust system that relieves backpressure. The result is 25 to 40 more horsepower and an additional 30 lb-ft of torque. Assume that final numbers will be between 625 and 640 hp and 453 lb-ft of torque. They’re still working out the details. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission has also been re-optimized for crisper, smarter shifts. The last time we tested a Huracán, it hit 60 mph in 2.8 seconds. Expect the Performante to be quicker.

Weight is down by about 90 pounds, thanks in part to that new exhaust system, which alone reduces fat by nearly 25 pounds. The rest of the weight loss is due to increased use of forged carbon fiber composite, or Forged Carbon (FC) as Lamborghini would like you to call it. The largest single piece of FC on the Performante is the rear wing, which is where the bulk of the ALA magic happens.

A side note: There was an internal fight at Lambo in regard to the car’s name, with none other than board member and R & D boss Maurizio Reggiani thinking Superleggera was the better moniker. However, because the primary focus of the car is performance and not lightweighting, Reggiani and several others were overruled.

The suspension has been massively reworked. The electric lime green Huracán with fixed dampers that I drove for an “Ignition” episode had brilliant handling. To be blunt, the other one—our long-term Huracán—with magnetic dampers, did not. That dark gray MR car pushed and understeered, and it felt a bit mushy (it also weighed 200-plus pounds more somehow). It simply wasn’t as sweet. It’s important to remember, though, the Huracán was Lamborghini’s first use of magnetorheological shocks; They didn’t do a great job. The Aventador Superveloce was their second effort, and based on that alone, my mind was at ease. The Performante represents something of a third draft, and the results are stellar.

What’s different? For one, the aforementioned shocks have been retuned to deal with the fast-acting active aero gear and as a result are much stiffer. The springs and anti-roll bars are retuned to provide 10 percent more vertical stiffness and 15 percent more roll stiffness. All the bushings are about 50 percent stiffer to cope with the stickier tires. The adjustable steering has been revamped, though most of the changes are in Corsa (track) mode. The Performante also gets newly developed special-application high-performance Pirelli P Zero Corsas. This caused the all-wheel-drive system to be reprogrammed and the ABS system to be reworked. Brake pedal feel is also improved. Finally, the ESC system was revamped. Because the Performante is more stable than the regular Huracán, ESC is less intrusive. Switch into Sport mode, and you’re essentially in Drift mode.

Then there’s ALA, for which you can thank Antonio Torluccio, Lamborghini’s head of aerodynamics and previously an engineer on both the V-10 and V-12 programs. Torluccio describes ALA as a smarter way to do active aero. Think about traditional active aero, such as on the Bugatti Veyron or Lamborghini’s own Centenario. Typically you have a large wing on some hydraulic struts. Based on conditions, the struts change the wing’s position. It works, but there are two drawbacks. One is speed, as most hydraulically adjustable wings need about a second to move fully from one position to another. The second is weight, as hydraulic fluid is heavy.

Renault New Alpine A110 // Nouvelle Alpine A110

Combining the timeless Alpine principles of compact size, lightweight and agility, this mid-engined two-seat sports coupe is true to the spirit of its predecessors and in particular the A110 ‘Berlinette’. The new car will be built in the Alpine factory in Dieppe and deliveries will start late 2017 in Continental Europe. Deliveries in the UK and Japan will start in 2018.
Alpine is back to claim its position in the sports car segment, with only one promise: driving pleasure.

// Reprenant les principes intemporels qui ont fait le succès d’Alpine – compacité, légèreté et agilité – ce coupé deux places à moteur central arrière reste fidèle à l’esprit de ses origines et à l’A110 « Berlinette ».
Fabriqué à Dieppe, en France, il sera commercialisé fin 2017, en Europe continentale puis en Grande Bretagne et au Japon en 2018.
Alpine est de retour et entend reprendre sa place sur le segment des véhicules de sport avec une promesse : le plaisir de conduire.